World's Oldest Fledgling

The blog of Stephanie Wardrop, Y A Author

Cover Reveal: THE ENLIGHTENING

Today is the cover reveal of The Enlightening (Mackenzie Duncan Series #2) by Adrianne James.

Title: The Enlightening

Series: Mackenzie Duncan Series #2

Author: Adrianne James

Genre: NA Paranormal

Release Date: December 6,2013

Add to your Want to Read list on Goodreads

Mackenzie Duncan found out that pack life wasn’t for her. Now she is running for the second time in the six months since she was bitten and turned into a Werewolf. But this time, she isn’t alone. This time, she has Geoff and Liam with her, two very hot Werewolves vying for her heart.

But her companions aren’t her focus. The only thing she can focus on is getting far from her old pack and their murderous ways. Only, she doesn’t just want to run. She wants to warn every pack she can that their lives are in danger too. No one should be turned against their will like she was and no other pack should have to surrender to the ideas of a centuries old, power hungry woman.

Not only does Mackenzie have to deal with her crazy ex-pack leader sending people out to kill her, she has to keep both men at arm’s length (and that proves to be much more difficult than she thought), but she finds out more about her own life and heritage than she ever thought imaginable.

And suddenly, everything makes sense…

Giveaway

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About Adrianne James

Growing up, Adrianne couldn’t get her hands on enough books to satisfy her need for the make believe. If she finished a novel and didn’t have a new one ready and waiting for her, she began to create her own tales of magic and wonder. Now, as an adult, books still make up majority of her free time, and now her tales get written down to be shared with the world.

During the day, Adrianne uses her camera to capture life’s stories for clients of all ages and at night, after her two children are tucked in bed; she devotes herself to her written work. Adrianne is living the life she always wanted, surrounded by art and beauty, the written word and a loving family.

As a young adult and new adult author, Adrianne James has plans to bring stories of growing characters, a little romance, and perhaps a little magic and mythology down the line for her readers to enjoy.

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Have a Masked Love Holiday this Season!

Image Nicole Zoltack’s just released a holiday Regency novella from Swoon Romance, and it sounds like a good one! Here’s a taste:

Isabelle is content being a maid, and will do anything for her lady, even accompany her to a masquerade ball. Lady Theodosia needs extra support and encouragement on this night, for tomorrow she will meet the man her parents have pledged her to. 
Isabelle has never had occasion to attend such an event, and is at first ill at ease. But meeting an enchanting young man during the course of the evening makes her wish for a life she can never have. Thinking she will never see him again, she returns his flirtation and even reveals her face. Imagine her shock when he shows up the next morning, announcing his claim on Lady Thedosia. 
Isabelle does all she can to avoid Lord Adrian Wingave, but then he not only sees her, he recognizes her. To make matters worse, Isabelle fears her feelings are not one-sided. Torn between duty and desire, Isabelle hopes for something more this Christmas.

As a Regency/Jane Austen fan myself, I was happy to join her blog tour to introduce the book to the world. And since it’s almost officially the holiday season, Nicole and I thought we would share some Regency-era holiday traditions you could incorporate into your festivities next month.

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The Christmas tree itself didn’t become as popular as it is now until later in the nineteenth century, though some Regency homes would have had trees decorated with ornaments and candles if they were connected with German traditions. There’s some debate about who brought the Christmas tree to England, with some arguing that Prince Albert did so, and others claiming Queen Charlotte introduced it in 1800; both are German-born.

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Boughs were also brought inside country homes, filling them with the fragrance of holly or hawthorn, and “kissing boughs” of evergreens, apples and flowers might hang over doorways like our more familiar mistletoe. Christmas carols are also more of a Victorian tradition, though if you were the first to sit by the Yule log in the fireplace you were considered likely to have good luck in the future.  On Christmas Day, you’d likely attend church, then have a family dinner (often a boar’s head — ewwww) and plum pudding (which my mom makes every year with a coin baked in for good luck). Gifts were given mostly to children or to the landowner in the form of a tithe; the next day, Boxing Day, the gentry would reward their servants and other aides with a Christmas “box” or gift.

As for the traditional “White Christmas”, sources indicate that the weather in the Regency era in late December was often rainy and damp and too warm for snow.  Nonetheless, this illustration from an 1898 edition of Jane Austen’s Emma is titled “Christmas Weather”:

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Whatever you celebrate and whatever the weather where you do so, we wish you happy, as an Austen character would say.
Check out Nicole at her website and blog, on Facebook, and on Twitter.
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JC Emery on Ride-ing with Bad Boys

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JC Emery is not just a writer of some steamy, kick-ass romances, like

Image in the Men in Badges series,

or

Image, the first in a series about bikers, Bayonet Scars.

She’s also one of the most honest and forthright people I know; she means what she says and she says what she means and makes no apologies. So we got to talking last week about bad boys in romance fiction, how they have always been so popular and why they remain so, and how troubling we, as writers and women and feminists, often find the depiction of truly bad boys, the kind that will assault the heroine to prove his love to her. (Think Rhett Butler telling Scarlet O’Hara he will “crush [her] skull like a walnut.” That’s not hot. That’s sick. If anyone says that to you and considers it foreplay, run.)

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With incidences of domestic/relationship violence on the rise, particularly among young people, it’s worth considering how much romance fiction insists on the potential for violence as a sexy attribute in a mate.  Recently scholars and book fans alike have written with  fear and disgust about Twilight‘s Edward Cullen as a charming sociopath. (See Journal of Communication Inquiry 2011 35: 157 and Debra Merskin’s article “A Boyfriend to Die For: Edward Cullen as Compensated Psychopath in Stephenie Meyer’s Twilightfor a stellar example). And while I agree that there can be a great gulf between what we desire in our fantasies and what we want in our real lives, I still want to tell me daughter when she’s in the throes of her first crush (I’m not counting Niall Horan from One Direction),I don’t care how much the boy sparkles- if you tell me he’s been climbing into your room and watching you sleep for months, I am calling the cops.”

Now JC’s hero in Ride is a little rough around the edges, a bad boy by many definitions of the term, but he’s not dangerous to the woman he loves.  Check him out:

“IT’S NOT FUNNY,” she whines through a scowl, but the smile on her face is bright.

“Oh yes it is,” I say, with a grin. “What kind of mafia princess doesn’t learn how to shoot a gun?”

“The passive kind,” she grumbles, looking at my .38 she’s holding with both hands. I force myself to keep grinning, avoiding the impending anxiety that’s creeping up. When I first handed the gun over to her, I was nervous as fuck. I mean, I’d never given a chick I was fucking my piece before. But Cub doesn’t know how to shoot, and with everything going on, she has to learn. I don’t give a fuck how difficult she’s being about it. Hell, even if Junior wasn’t on his way here, I’d still teach her how to shoot. Yesterday, I gave up being pissed that her fucktard of a father didn’t teach her sooner.

It’s been days since I’ve spent more than ten minutes without Cub by my side. I’m getting way too comfortable falling asleep with her curled into my side, and waking up with her half on top of me. The longer it takes for something fucked to happen, the more on edge I get. Despite spending pretty much every minute with Cub and her pussy, which I swear is made out of unicorns or some shit, I can feel the tension in my bones. She walks around acting like she doesn’t really care what’s going on or the sacrifices the club is making to keep her tight little ass safe. I’m trying not to let her piss me off, but damn it, she’s working my last nerve. It doesn’t help that I haven’t had a drink or any bud since before Church the other day.

“You’re doing it again,” she says, handing the gun back to me. Her smiles falls, giving way to a grimace. I click the safety lock and shove it in the back of my waist.

“Doing what?” I ask, trying to keep the strain out of my voice.

“That thing with your neck. You keep tensing your jaw, and it makes the veins in your neck pop out. It’s creepy.”

“I’m on edge,” I say and blow out a deep breath.

 He’s no saint, that’s clear (though he does go to church). He’s tough, profane, and capable of violence, but that’s never going to be turned on the heroine, Cub. Despite her current inability to handle a .38, she’s an equal partner in this relationship, and that’s one of the aspects of JC’s offbeat romances that make them so delightful.

I’ll give her the final word on bad boys and what’s “too” bad to bear:

I don’t necessarily think there’s a definitive line in the sand to be drawn over what behaviors are acceptable in fiction and which ones are not. As a loud-mouth feminist and unapologetic biker fan, I find myself torn. I know all too well the way it works with lifestyle bikers (as opposed to weekend riders). And this is in no way a criticism of the lifestyle of all bikers, because as a group, they are as varied as any culture is. Some motorcycle clubs are about community service, some are about freedom, but there is a subculture within the greater biker community called outlaw bikers. The outlaw biker culture is vastly different from what we know most people to be. It is often de-humanizing to women, with few women being respected enough to be treated as a person. Women are often passed around, dismissed, and even beaten-up on. So I find myself both intrigued and disgusted by this world. How can a feminist like these kinds of guys?

Most women I know are drawn to alpha males, and while men in fiction may get away with murder (and then some), their real life counterparts have to toe a much finer line. The guys in my Men with Badges series are all inherently good. They may make the wrong choices along the way, but it’s with the best of intentions. Here’s how I think I make the bad boys work in relation to that. It’s like the flip side of the coin. The men in the Bayonet Scars series (Ride, No. 1, due out 10/28) are not who western society traditionally considers to be good guys. They drink, do drugs, have a ton of sex, curse… they can be mean and violent, and they don’t apologize for it. But like you’ve seen in a lot of romance novels where their behaviors are forgiven or justified, I try very hard not to do that.
I don’t write weak women. They don’t forgive poor behavior necessarily, they just sometimes either don’t care or they may choose not to make an issue of it. Other female characters may raise hell over something. It depends on who’s in what situation. None of my women feel helpless without a man around (I wouldn’t even know how to write that), and none of them ever feel like they’ll die without the company of their true love. (Forgive the gagging sounds). They are as complex and messed up as the men they fall in love with. I think that’s the only way a romance like this can work. Good girls who fall in love with bad boys always get hurt, because bad boys don’t magically become good guys over night. The women in the Bayonet Scars series actively choose to stay. And none of them are without faults and poor behaviors of their own. They see the men they love with clear eyes (eventually) and they make the choice to love this disturbed man. I don’t feel sorry for them for choosing to stay if he’s a bastard. Being raped and held captive? Yes, I feel for the woman who ensures that. The woman who knows going in of her free will that she’s hooking up with a horn dog? Not so much. Eyes wide open, ladies. He is who he is; don’t expect him to change into something he’s not. Deal with it or move on. In that regard, I think having strong-willed proactive women on the page who make their own rules and give the men an option to hop on board or leave them alone, is important to giving readers a couple they can root for. My ladies are always the ones who set the rules of the relationship. She might fight like hell for terms and conditions she’s comfortable with, but she will walk if her guy doesn’t measure up. It’s just about giving the man traits she can live with, and giving her expectations he can abide by. And that will differ from couple to couple.
Some of the men in the series come to us already trying to make a change in their life, others come to us fighting hard to stop change. I’m not a huge fan of story lines where a woman comes along and suddenly this awful man turns over a new leaf for her. Waking up next to her in bed and he realizes he’s been a total scumbag his entire life? I don’t think so. I think, for the most part, people are fairly stagnant at their core. A rapist is a rapist. If he’s going to violently force himself on a woman, I don’t see him one day realizing what he’s done is awful and unforgivable. It’s the same reason I can’t believe Michael Vick now realizes that dog fighting is wrong. Prison doesn’t change who you are at the core. It either makes you toe the line so you don’t return, or it tears you down, making you meaner and more volatile.
Knowing the dirty details of the world my characters live in, I have to straddle the line between romance and realism. And maybe I have a disturbed way of looking at romance, but I think there is something very romantic about the deeply flawed individual trying to be better, whether they ever succeed or not. Giving a character someone they feel is worth trying for is key. But in order to understand what trying and being good look like in the biker world, we have to understand the parameters which we’re working within.
One thing that makes writing an outlaw biker romance difficult is that romances typically make the love story between the characters the most important aspect of both character’s worlds. Not only is that implausible in the outlaw biker culture, it disregards the core belief system of these clubs. These clubs, outlaw or not, only truly function when they treat one another as individuals and their club as the most important thing in their everyday life. Whoever you family is, whatever your job is, wherever you’re from, all becomes history and the club becomes your first priority. Outlaw or not, there’s great honor in standing beside someone and knowing you’d take a bullet for him/her and he/she’d take one for you. Not many cultures promote or allow for this kind of loyalty, whereas in outlaw biker culture, it’s mandatory. An outlaw biker protecting his brother (fellow patched club member) over a woman he just met IS being loyal in his world. Ideally, he could save them both. But making the choice to protect his club– whether that be an individual member or the entire unit– shouldn’t be seen as being anything less than loyal.
What makes romance work within the bounds of club life is that, unlike other criminal organizations, bikers are prone to inviting the women in their lives (Old Ladies) into a certain amount of club business. The women who are well-regarded within these organizations receive unparalleled respect and protection from patched members. A woman who achieves this status level within a club is considered family. If somebody picks a fight with a member’s Old Lady, he’s picking a fight with the entire club. It doesn’t matter if you like the guy’s wife/girlfriend or not. It also doesn’t matter if she was wrong. What matters is that you protect your own. Always.
Because of her station within the club, she may be treated very well or very poorly. Just like patched members, women in this lifestyle have to play by a certain set of rules. If she understands her place within the organization and is supportive of the club, she has a much better chance of having a positive experience. However, a woman who goes against the club is subject to similar penalties as that of a member. An in-house betrayal is a serious problem and is dealt with in-house. If her heartthrob bad boy uses her as a punching bag, it’s up to the club to rectify that, if they’re the kind of club that even would rectify an issue like that. And this is where the fiction comes in– I’m not going to glorify a man who beats his woman. I’m not going to glorify a rapist. I’m not going to try to convince anyone that the messed up stuff my characters do is excusable. I’m not in the business of justifying behaviors, I’m just telling a story.
I try to find the balance between what’s realistic and the story I want to tell by conceding certain things. Following the same thoughts as above, if a man cheats on every woman he’s ever been with, then surely he’s going to cheat on our heroine. I’m sorry if romance readers don’t like that, but I don’t see a way around it. So instead of writing a guy who’s cheated, I’m more inclined to write a guy who may be a murderer, a drug dealer, a pimp, but he’s always been faithful when he’s in a relationship. Or, if I must, I may hint at extracurricular activities, but never put it on the page. The part of romance that has always appealed to me is the lowest of the lows. How do these characters relate to one another, how do they interact, even when the absolute worst possible things are going on around them? If my bad-ass alpha male outlaw biker is in a screaming match with his girl, he may say the worst things imaginable to her, but he’s might not storm out and cheat on her. Or if he cheats on her, he may not yell at her. I don’t know that we can say that’s being “good” to her or not, but it’s the concession I make.
[Warning: possible Breaking Bad spoiler]
Being good to people means different things in different situations. In some worlds and situations it means saying please and thank you. In others, it means killing your stalker. And in some worlds, it means showing someone you love them by setting them free. I think what we saw during the Breaking Bad series finale was the ultimate act of redemption. For those who haven’t seen Breaking Bad, you might want to stop now. Though, I’ll try to avoid giving too much away. Walter White is a fifty year-old high school chemistry teacher who is diagnosed with terminal, in-operable lung cancer. Already stretched to his financial limit by his disabled teenage son, and pregnant stay-at-home wife, Walt reaches his breaking point. At his lowest low, he makes choices which change who he is and the rest of his life with such magnitude that nobody in his path is unaffected by the consequences of his actions.
But what happens in the final episode brings us full circle to who he was in the first episode. Walt’s character doesn’t necessarily change throughout the series, but rather expands. We see him do all of these horrific things over the course of five seasons, and then at the very end, we see him try to right those wrongs. But again, keeping in mind the world he lives in, righting his wrongs is not done with an apology and a handshake. Walt doesn’t have the luxury of adhering to the social laws of mainstream society. But he does manage, in the most realistic way possible, to redeem himself. A man who I had given up on a few episodes prior, had me sniffling and cheering him on in the final moments. To me, that says that almost any character is redeemable.
Just like in outlaw biker circles, there are different rules that must be followed, not only out of respect for those around you, but to simply stay alive. It’s important that readers/viewers not expect an outlaw who lives beyond the bounds of what we consider decency to adhere to the mainstream systems of laws and beliefs. There are some behaviors which I think are universally unforgivable such as any kind of sexual assault. Murder, depending on the world and situation may even be acceptable. But the one characteristic I require of all my male leads is that they be loyal. Where their loyalty lies may be troubling for some. But I strive to always write characters and scenarios that feel genuine, regardless of how sometimes awful we may consider them to be.
You’ve met two of her characters briefly now.  Go check them out.  Ride just received its 99th review on Amazon, so you’ll want come climb on and go for a spin.  Find it on Amazon,Smashwords, and Goodreads.
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Nazarea Andrews’ Beautiful Broken

Image Today the blog gets to host Nazarea Andres on her blog tour promoting Beautiful Broken, the second book in the University of Branton series!

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Since I have spent almost my entire adult life on college campuses, I was especially intrigued by the idea that Nazarea’s University of Branton series is set at a fictional college. She graciously answered my questions about college as a setting, writing a series, and what she hopes her readers think of her latest offering, BEAUTIFUL BROKEN. My first question was about why she chose her setting. She wrote

I loved college. For some people, high school is THE golden years. For me, I really blossomed in college, and I adored it. With the explosion of the New Adult category, I could write about it. So I did. College setting was a completely natural setting for me, based on that.

 On the question of whether Branton is based on a “real” college, she said

The town of Branton is very (VERY) loosely based on a few towns I grew up in. The college is equally loosely based on the tiny college I went to school at—there’s several scenes when writing, I totally pictured my lecture hall and school library. Of course, nothing very dramatic happened there.

 Since Scout and Dane also appear in This Love, I wondered if she knew as she wrote that book that they would be getting their own in Beautiful Broken.  She said 

I knew Dane would, almost from the first scene he’s in. (Which, is like, the first chapter of This Love). I didn’t know what his story was, but I knew he had a lot of shtuff going on behind that sexy face. When Scout appeared in the book, things started to click and they started clamoring for me to tell their story. I knew they were going to take me a darker place than Avery and Atticus, but I’ll admit that I loved writing their story.

And as for the source of her characters – well, Nazarea might be keeping mum about that 🙂

There are personality traits in all my characters that are pulled from people I know. Descriptions, definitely can be influenced by real life. But, no. My characters tend to come straight from my head. Which is good, because Dane and Scout would be a mess to have in my real life. I do hope readers find things to relate to—it’s nice when my readers connect with the characters, right? 🙂

 Finally, I like to ask writers what they hope readers will take away from their book, what they want the reader to feel, and I think I like Nazarea’s answer best, so far:

Daaaaayum.

Lol, that’s a reaction, right?? No, I’d love for them to feel. Anything at all, although obviously, it’d be nice to have them LOOOOOVE the book. I’d like them to look past the initial appearance (neither of which is good when looking at Dane and Scout) and see what motivates the choices people make.

1.  What made you decide to place the series at a university? What

 made a university seem like such a greta place to set a series of

 books (and it’s such a great idea I can’t believe that everyone

 doesn’t do it!)

I loved college. For some people, high school is THE golden years. For me, I really blossomed in college, and I adored it. With the explosion of the New Adult category, I could write about it. So I did. College setting was a completely natural setting for me, based on that.

 2. Is Braxton based (even loosely) on a real campus or school? In what

 way?  [And BTW, is it BRAXTON or BRANTON? I see both on the internet,

 and right now my connection is so slow I can’t look it up again 😦 ]

The town of Branton is very (VERY) loosely based on a few towns I grew up in. The college is equally loosely based on the tiny college I went to school at—there’s several scenes when writing, I totally pictured my lecture hall and school library. Of course, nothing very dramatic happened there.

 3.  What made you want to tell this particular story, the one about

 Scout and Dane? Did you know they were going to get their own book as

 you wrote _This Love_, in which they also appear?

I knew Dane would, almost from the first scene he’s in. (Which, is like, the first chapter of This Love). I didn’t know what his story was, but I knew he had a lot of shtuff going on behind that sexy face. When Scout appeared in the book, things started to click and they started clamoring for me to tell their story. I knew they were going to take me a darker place than Avery and Atticus, but I’ll admit that I loved writing their story.

 4. Do you find that readers, particularly college-aged ones, see

 themselves or people they know in these characters? You seem to have

 created ones that people can easily relate to. Do you base any of your

 characters on real people or people you know? (I like to think I

 don’t, but really, don’t we sort of have to do that, even

 unconsciously? Or else none of the characters would seem remotely

 “real”.)

There are personality traits in all my characters that are pulled from people I know. Descriptions, definitely can be influenced by real life. But, no. My characters tend to come straight from my head. Which is good, because Dane and Scout would be a mess to have in my real life. I do hope readers find things to relate to—it’s nice when my readers connect with the characters, right? 🙂

 5. Finally, what do you hope people think or feel after finishing the

 book? If you could control this, which we writers know we can’t :),

 what would you like people to take away from BEAUTIFUL BROKEN?

Daaaaayum.

Lol, that’s a reaction, right?? No, I’d love for them to feel. Anything at all, although obviously, it’d be nice to have them LOOOOOVE the book. I’d like them to look past the initial appearance (neither of which is good when looking at Dane and Scout) and see what motivates the choices people make.

 Don’t you want to have that reaction, too? So go read the book! It’s available at Amazon as an ebook, or paperback and at Barnes and Noble.  And connect with Nazarea at her site, her blog, on Twitter, and Facebook.

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The Pride and Prep School Scavenger Hunt

Here’s your invitation to play a game, check out some great blogs, and win an autographed copy of the novellas and a $20-dollar gift card from Amazon!

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First, you’ll have to answer the questions below to find out what you’re looking for.  Then, once you know what objects will be hidden on participating blogs, you’ll have to  visit them (which, trust me, you would want to do anyway). Once you find them, report back here with the answers as comments (tell me what you found and where).

1.  On their first day as bio lab partners, what does Georgia tell Michael she will not be a part of?

2.  Jeremy invented a drink by this name, and he gave a lot of them to Georgia on New Year’s Eve.

3.  Georgia has a pet that likes to bite people a lot.  What is it?

4.  Leigh gets teased for dressing like a member of this “old order” sect that lives primarily in Pennsylvania and Ohio.

5. What literary character does Georgia want to do a class presentation about (though Michael thinks this is a lame idea)?

6. In Pride and Prep School, what does Georgia discover in the Endicott kitchen that makes her think she just might have been wrong about him all along?

7. Georgia, Trey, Michael, and Tori watch a movie about these creatures of the night until Michael can’t stand it any more.

8. In P&PS Michael runs into Georgia in a suburban drug store and is shocked to find her holding this.

9. Georgia is surprised to discover that Michael enjoys listening to the music of this Caribbean artist.

10.  Dave and Gary have a punk band; this animal is part of the name of the band.

Once you know what you’re looking for, you’ll have to look for pictures of these items on these blogs:

 JC Emery:   http://jcemery.com/
The Things That Run Through My Mind: http://monicabsanz.blogspot.com/
Where Fantasy and Love Take Flight: http://nicolezoltack.blogspot.com/
Team Elsker: http://stbende.blogspot.com/
Just Sayin’ : http://nazarea-andrews.blogspot.com/
Jessica: Brooks’ Let Me Tell You A Story: coffeelvnmom.blogspot.com
Adrianne James: http://adriannejames.com/ (Note: Adrianne, in keeping with the spirit of the scavenger hunt, has made you hunt for it.  But it’s there!)
JayCee DeLorenzo’s See JayceeJugggle
A Day in the Crazy Wonderful Beautiful Life: http://rachelbateman.com/
Louise Gornall:  http://bookishblurb.com/blog/

THE CONTEST IS OPEN TO US AND INTERNATIONAL READERS BETWEEN WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16TH, AND SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20TH AT 8:00 PM EASTERN STANDARD TIME. The winner will be chosen randomly from all correct entries and on Monday, October 21st and announced on this blog on Tuesday, October 22d.  Leave a comment with your answers to the questions and where you found them PLUS your email so I can send you your stuff!

GOOD LUCK AND HAPPY READING!

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A Tempting TEMPERING

WIP IT  WEREWOLF WEDNESDAY

1174388_351064998359976_22406724_n ADRIANNE JAMES’ THE TEMPERING RELEASED LAST WEEK AND ALREADY PEOPLE ARE TALKING ABOUT THIS EXCITING TALE OF LOVE, BETRAYAL,RIVALRY, AND WEREWOLVES.

I got to talk to the heroine of this new series, MacKenzie Duncan, and while she was careful not to reveal any of the plot, she did provide some fascinating insight into (were)wolf culture:

So, Mackenzie, thanks for talking to me! I can honestly say that I have never sat down with a werewolf before. But I bet you get that a lot.

Unfortunately, yes. Most people think that Werewolves are just myth. Hell, so did I until a few months ago.
 F810_blog

My son is actually very interested in wolves and wolf “culture” and we’ve been to wolf preserves and conservation places.  They have a fascinating social structure. Is the werewolf structure similar to wolf structure, with alphas and all of that stuff?
Most wolves are in packs. The packs have a leader and apparently they have a hierarchy. They tend to keep those politics to them self for a while. Secretive group. *shakes head in irritation*
 
Werewolf structure also seems to have an extra hierarchy, the whole “bitten” versus “born” thing. Could you explain that a little?
Gah! Where do I start. Bittens seem to be second class. We have to be baby sat on full moons, we can’t hold any real position in the pack, and we can’t be the mate of a Born. Born wolves apparently are better than bitten. Whatever.
Is there anything you miss from your old, human life?
I miss being normal. I miss not turning into a blood thirsty beast. I miss sitting in my tiny apartment working on the hundreth paper of the night. But most of all I miss being in complete and total ignorant bliss about this whole damn thing.
What’s best about this new life?
Well, I found some really great people. Some really bad ones too, but there have been moments where I have been happier than I ever was before.
Finally, I have to ask – are you Team Jacob? How do you feel about Twilight’s depiction of werewolf life?
Considering they would be considered BORN werewolves, with complete control and memory of their time as fur balls, I would say I was sorta jealous. As to if I’m Team Jacob? Well just the thought of being close to a vampire gives me the chills, so yeah, Team Jacob all the way. Although…he could do way better than Bella or her offspring.   images-3
Thanks so much for talking to me! I can’t wait to get started on the series.
You can get started, too by buying The Tempering at Amazon or Smashwords or Barnes and Noble.
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Get Tempted by THE TEMPERING

Get Tempted by THE TEMPERING

The Tempering (The Mackenzie Duncan Series) by Adrianne James (Star Bound Books). After being attacked by a wolf, Mackenzie Duncan realizes something is not right. She heals quickly, is suddenly super strong, and is experiencing mood swings that can’t possibly be normal. Fear of what she is, and who she might hurt, sends Mackenzie running from the life she’s worked hard to build — and straight into the arms of a handsome Were named Geoff. But being a werewolf means having no control … and no memory of her time as a blood thirsty beast. Can Mackenzie set aside her own sense of morals to belong to a pack that is like family or will she leave everything behind yet again in search of a life she can be proud of?

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