World's Oldest Fledgling

The blog of Stephanie Wardrop, Y A Author

Nazarea Andrews’ Beautiful Broken

on October 21, 2013

Image Today the blog gets to host Nazarea Andres on her blog tour promoting Beautiful Broken, the second book in the University of Branton series!

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Since I have spent almost my entire adult life on college campuses, I was especially intrigued by the idea that Nazarea’s University of Branton series is set at a fictional college. She graciously answered my questions about college as a setting, writing a series, and what she hopes her readers think of her latest offering, BEAUTIFUL BROKEN. My first question was about why she chose her setting. She wrote

I loved college. For some people, high school is THE golden years. For me, I really blossomed in college, and I adored it. With the explosion of the New Adult category, I could write about it. So I did. College setting was a completely natural setting for me, based on that.

 On the question of whether Branton is based on a “real” college, she said

The town of Branton is very (VERY) loosely based on a few towns I grew up in. The college is equally loosely based on the tiny college I went to school at—there’s several scenes when writing, I totally pictured my lecture hall and school library. Of course, nothing very dramatic happened there.

 Since Scout and Dane also appear in This Love, I wondered if she knew as she wrote that book that they would be getting their own in Beautiful Broken.  She said 

I knew Dane would, almost from the first scene he’s in. (Which, is like, the first chapter of This Love). I didn’t know what his story was, but I knew he had a lot of shtuff going on behind that sexy face. When Scout appeared in the book, things started to click and they started clamoring for me to tell their story. I knew they were going to take me a darker place than Avery and Atticus, but I’ll admit that I loved writing their story.

And as for the source of her characters – well, Nazarea might be keeping mum about that :)

There are personality traits in all my characters that are pulled from people I know. Descriptions, definitely can be influenced by real life. But, no. My characters tend to come straight from my head. Which is good, because Dane and Scout would be a mess to have in my real life. I do hope readers find things to relate to—it’s nice when my readers connect with the characters, right? :)

 Finally, I like to ask writers what they hope readers will take away from their book, what they want the reader to feel, and I think I like Nazarea’s answer best, so far:

Daaaaayum.

Lol, that’s a reaction, right?? No, I’d love for them to feel. Anything at all, although obviously, it’d be nice to have them LOOOOOVE the book. I’d like them to look past the initial appearance (neither of which is good when looking at Dane and Scout) and see what motivates the choices people make.

1.  What made you decide to place the series at a university? What

 made a university seem like such a greta place to set a series of

 books (and it’s such a great idea I can’t believe that everyone

 doesn’t do it!)

I loved college. For some people, high school is THE golden years. For me, I really blossomed in college, and I adored it. With the explosion of the New Adult category, I could write about it. So I did. College setting was a completely natural setting for me, based on that.

 2. Is Braxton based (even loosely) on a real campus or school? In what

 way?  [And BTW, is it BRAXTON or BRANTON? I see both on the internet,

 and right now my connection is so slow I can’t look it up again :( ]

The town of Branton is very (VERY) loosely based on a few towns I grew up in. The college is equally loosely based on the tiny college I went to school at—there’s several scenes when writing, I totally pictured my lecture hall and school library. Of course, nothing very dramatic happened there.

 3.  What made you want to tell this particular story, the one about

 Scout and Dane? Did you know they were going to get their own book as

 you wrote _This Love_, in which they also appear?

I knew Dane would, almost from the first scene he’s in. (Which, is like, the first chapter of This Love). I didn’t know what his story was, but I knew he had a lot of shtuff going on behind that sexy face. When Scout appeared in the book, things started to click and they started clamoring for me to tell their story. I knew they were going to take me a darker place than Avery and Atticus, but I’ll admit that I loved writing their story.

 4. Do you find that readers, particularly college-aged ones, see

 themselves or people they know in these characters? You seem to have

 created ones that people can easily relate to. Do you base any of your

 characters on real people or people you know? (I like to think I

 don’t, but really, don’t we sort of have to do that, even

 unconsciously? Or else none of the characters would seem remotely

 “real”.)

There are personality traits in all my characters that are pulled from people I know. Descriptions, definitely can be influenced by real life. But, no. My characters tend to come straight from my head. Which is good, because Dane and Scout would be a mess to have in my real life. I do hope readers find things to relate to—it’s nice when my readers connect with the characters, right? :)

 5. Finally, what do you hope people think or feel after finishing the

 book? If you could control this, which we writers know we can’t :),

 what would you like people to take away from BEAUTIFUL BROKEN?

Daaaaayum.

Lol, that’s a reaction, right?? No, I’d love for them to feel. Anything at all, although obviously, it’d be nice to have them LOOOOOVE the book. I’d like them to look past the initial appearance (neither of which is good when looking at Dane and Scout) and see what motivates the choices people make.

 Don’t you want to have that reaction, too? So go read the book! It’s available at Amazon as an ebook, or paperback and at Barnes and Noble.  And connect with Nazarea at her site, her blog, on Twitter, and Facebook.

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